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Red Pill TheoryAn Easy Technique That Shuts Off Mental Chatter And Makes You More Extroverted (self.TheRedPill)

submitted by TitusNoel

A big component of successful gaming, and really, every area of our lives, is how in touch with the external world we are.

There is nothing physically blocking you from speaking to a hot girl, only mental obstacles make it so.

This is an easy technique that you can use to be more in contact with reality, make yourself more extroverted, and reduce the bullshit in your head.

The ability to see the world "as it is" will free you up for action.

The Extroversion Drills

The purpose of these drills is to put you in contact with the reality around you.

Drill: Put your eyes on things your walking by.

For example:

  • Put your eyes on a lamp;
  • notice the lamp;
  • notice that you're noticing it.

This will shut down the parts of your brain that are always chattering.

Being unable to communicate with physical objects, like a chair and a lamp, makes you unable to communicate with human beings in an extroverted fashion. This is related to being in the present moment, seeing what's really there. Actually seeing something instead of just resting your eyes on it.

If you want to speed it up: Take a walk around the block when you come home from work. Do it as an active exercise. Actively seek out places with people and objects. Notice things and notice that you notice things.

If you work with people all day, the problem gets turned around. Salesmen and people in the medical field look at people as solids.

Do the same drill, but when you look at a person, look at them as an entire person. Take them in from head to toe as a person, and find 2-3 things you like about them. Try to restore the humanity/liking between two humans. Stop looking at people as objects.

Do these drills until you're absolutely sick and tired of them.

Wrapping It Up

This helps you extrovert. Notice I didn't say "become extroverted." That is a nominalization, making a process a stuck thing. Being extroverted is a process. By noticing things in your environment, and noticing that you are noticing these things, you shut down the bullshit in your head and further the process of extroversion.

Combine this with simple meditation, diaphraghmatic breathing, and simple relaxation tools and you'll be able to shut off much of the bullshit going on in your head and take more action.


[–]NeoreactionSafe 122 points123 points  (30 children)

As a guy who is extroverted in real life here is my advice.

When in private take a real interest in truth in contemplation. (introversion)

When in public take a real interest in other people. (extroversion)

The missing ingredient for most people to open their eyes to actually see the world around them is fear.

Once you destroy your inner beta myths (which block reality and generate fear because you get confused about what you are seeing) it's easier to take a real interest in other people.

Kill the Beta does not mean you summon great blind courage and rush into things you can't understand.

When you Kill the Beta you kill the illusions... you become disillusioned. (a good thing for you)

It sounds crazy... but your ability to extrovert begins with the death of certain myths about human nature. Fear occurs because in your default beta state your mind is being so badly distorted as to not see others and not be able to judge their actions very well.

Red Pill is truthful... with the combination of truth and genuine interest it's much easier to extrovert.

Don't bluff extroversion. Do the hard work of Killing the Beta and it gets better.

Our fear is greatest when an unknown is further masked by a Blue Pill mythology.

.

[–][deleted] 12 points13 points  (11 children)

The missing ingredient for most people to open their eyes to actually see the world around them is fear... Once you destroy your inner beta myths (which block reality and generate fear because you get confused about what you are seeing) it's easier to take a real interest in other people.

Would love if you could expand on this. I don't identify as a beta, but I definitely do identify as an introvert. My default mode is very intensed, focused, and workaholic type (e.g. it is quite common for me to reject social gatherings just because eating out doesn't fit my macros, and impairs my studying schedule). Sure, it helps me get things done, but if I'm commuting to work and get stopped by a cute girl, I find it quite difficult to snap from "thinking/contemplating/serious mode" to "oh someone is engaging me, I need to socialize now mode". The same applies on a macro level -- where if it's exam month I find it quite difficult to just socialize in general (because I'm completely obsessed and focused on the mission at hand). Long story short, jumping back and forth from work to social, from serious and intense to casual and chill, takes a while for me to callibrate to. It's like you're driving full speed on one path, then suddenly you need to make a U-turn, it takes time. For me, after a night out, I pretty much need the entire next day to myself in order to recuperate -- I simply can't get anything done as productively the next day.

Furthermore, in public, I find it quite difficult to take a real interest in other people. I can appreciate that most people are not into self-improvement, that most people are flawed, lazy, undisciplined, and lack a certain drive, but I simply cannot find real interest in other people unless they have something that benefits me. If they don't I simply feel like I'm wasting my time when I could be doing something better instead.

[–]PandaMania3 3 points4 points  (8 children)

The work zone you referred to is your comfort zone. As while working you do not need to socialize at all.

There isn't much of a transition phrase actually. Humans in General can be smooth from one behavior to another.

What I can recommend to you is while engrossed in work, or while on transportation, stop what you're doing for the moment (especially if you're on the train/bus reading something off the phone or on a book), look up and take a look at your colleagues and other passengers.

Don't need to linger your gaze on then for too long, you just need to notice them enough to build their presence around you in that tight space, then continue what you're doing.

Most Beta tendencies I've noticed off is that they became mindful of people around them and tries to act "cool" or become as immobile as possible to not attract attention.

What you should be thinking is "I'm just doing my things, that's all."

It'll help in easing people who have the thinking that if they go out of line, they get judged.

[–][deleted] 7 points8 points  (7 children)

The work zone you referred to is your comfort zone.

I don't see the point in this. Sure, I'm comfortable when I work (being productive, learning, drinking some nice tea, definitely feels good when I'm not rushing deadlines). But at the same time, I'm also comfortable socializing one-on-one. I'm comfortable pretty much most of the time, and if I wasn't, I'd either do something about it or power through (e.g. in the gym).

What I can recommend to you is...

That's a interesting tip, but I do that already out of boredom. After going through a deck of flashcards for instance, I'd look around to ground myself back to reality, to clear my mind, to consolidate what I just learnt/memorized. Personally, I don't find find it helpful.

Most Beta tendencies

Again, that's not my question/issue. I know what you're talking about and that's something I don't really do (if anything I can be too obnoxious when I'm "in my own world/mind", without a care for the external environment and inadvertently attracting unwanted attention).

My issue, is finding real interest in other people. I'd love if we could discuss that instead, because it's quite a sticking point for me to overcome! :) To give you a bit of perspective, whenever I socialize with someone and the convo gets boring, I immediately think of all the better things I could be doing (work, hell even sleeping/meditating is productive), and I also come from a "what benefit/value do you bring to me" mindset. So unless I'm getting something from the interaction, I just won't bother sacrificing my time.

[–]PandaMania3 3 points4 points  (6 children)

My issue, is finding real interest in other people. I'd love if we could discuss that instead, because it's quite a sticking point for me to overcome! :) To give you a bit of perspective, whenever I socialize with someone and the convo gets boring, I immediately think of all the better things I could be doing (work, hell even sleeping/meditating is productive), and I also come from a "what benefit/value do you bring to me" mindset. So unless I'm getting something from the interaction, I just won't bother sacrificing my time.

Thanks for the details, it helps me to know more of where you're coming from.

I get the "boredom" you mean. That when you're carrying out conversation only to be disappointed by the other person as not able to meet ypur "expectation". I don't find that much of an issue as to most people, if someone else is only having conversation fpr the sake of having it and not benefiting yourself in the process, it's a real waste of time.

You'll have to slowly find from different people you're interacting with to find someone whom may actually be able to provide you with values. After all, there's so many people out there whom we've yet to know.

[–][deleted] 3 points4 points  (5 children)

Thing is even with most friends and 99% of the people I interact with, I deem boring. Given the high percentage, it's clear that this issue is something to do with my outlook.

I have no trouble interacting with new people, and could build great rapport for the ten to twenty minutes. After that I start losing interest and it kinda shows -- I stop putting effort into the conversation, and eventually I just leave.

In the same way, a lot of my friends/acquaintances "lose relevance" if I don't see them in a while (e.g. a week). They just stop existing in my life if they stop initiating hangouts or our communication just dwindles. It's like my mind automatically classifies our relationship/friendship to start back at ground zero, they just lose relevance. It's like that new hobby you picked up for a week and eventually stopped and never touched again. That's how my mind is (currently) programmed.

[–][deleted]  (4 children)

[deleted]

    [–][deleted] 2 points3 points  (2 children)

    Again, because I'm a med student and don't have much time to begin with, I already do that...

    I only scroll through Facebook/Whatsapp twice a day -- no mroe than 4-5 mins each and simply just to be polite and reply to people and event invititaotins.

    [–]ThrowTheEgg 1 point2 points  (1 child)

    I'm interested in what you're saying as I find I have similar reactions to others, and internal self-talk in social settings. Definitely a natural introvert, but not at all "shy"... I love engaging with others, but completely zone out when they don't seem to be contributing what I perceive as 'value'.

    One perspective I can offer - and from the few words you've written, there's no way to know so don't take this wrong but - is more humility, and interest in things that YOU don't know about, but they almost certainly will/do (you just haven't elicited them yet).

    For example: You will be hugely knowledgeable, and therefore confident, on a topic: say, e.g., "Spain." They may know NOTHING whatsover about Spain. Therefore, boring in their questions about "do they really sleep after lunch and not have dinner until 10pm??"

    And yet - they may know everything about ... many things. Cambodia. Curling. Camembert.

    Did you/do you explore what they know, and you don't? I find that interesting. The trick is, finding something they know about, are comfortable really getting into.... AND that you at least would find interesting. Small Business Tax Law, as another example, may have a great deal of knowledge and expertise behind it, but still not interested.

    There is probably a set of exploratory questions that exist, that could help elicit a shared interest but different knowledge level.

    Anyway, that's how I think. Doesn't always work.

    [–][deleted] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

    I do agree humility is something I really lack, but it's something that's really hard (without sounding egotistical, although I'm sure I do) to cultivate.

    It's hard to convince myself of this mindset.

    [–]OpenPacket 0 points1 point  (0 children)

    I know you're replying to another poster, but personally I found this post very helpful. Thankyou!

    [–]Hamster_S_Thompson 1 point2 points  (0 children)

    This perfectly describes how I feel.

    [–][deleted]  (11 children)

    [deleted]

      [–]NeoreactionSafe 44 points45 points  (10 children)

      Fear occurs because the Blue Pill mythology has so distorted the default mind as to create excessive anxiety.

      When you see people you might run through in your mind some of the abstract truths that Red Pill teaches in anticipation of what you will encounter.

      For example...

      You walk into a bar alone. You sit at the bar and observe your surroundings. Who is there? Is it full or empty?

      Let's say there are two guys to your left (likely friends) and a female bartender and two girls playing a round of pool. You hear the balls break "crack". What do you do?

      Well, you size up the guys to your left and strike up a casual conversation paying close attention to what they say. Can you steer the conversation? Do they want to ignore you? You adapt.

      Maybe the girls finish the pool game and come back to the bar and these guys are their beta orbiters. Now you are "somewhat" friends with these guys and the women are curious... and on and on...

      Extroversion means you adapt to everything and keep your eyes open and looking for angles.

      Red Pill gives clarity to your mind... use it.

      .

      Note: In this imaginary scenario I've already positioned myself to take these girls away from the guys who are orbiting. Is that in itself cruel? No. If a guy (or guys) can't pull the trigger and make a clear Alpha move on a woman they really have proven they are disqualified.

      You must be sincere in the truth of power.

      There is no guilt in a fair game when you defeat an orbiter... even if they had orbited for years.

      Now if they are boyfriends to the girls... that's okay... you can just be friends with the guys and see what happens next.

      I've had women give me phone numbers in front of their boyfriends, so never underestimate the insanity of todays woman. Even this circumstance can be managed.

      .

      Very rarely are you "trapped" by circumstances.

      If you do start to feel too much pressure just change some element in the environment. Take a pee. Come back and stand somewhere else. Say something to someone else. Just keep engaging in new situations and testing different angles.

      Once you get good at it you have fun doing it.

      .

      [–]ConfessionsofaLurker 8 points9 points  (3 children)

      Note: In this imaginary scenario I've already positioned myself to take these girls away from the guys who are orbiting. Is that in itself cruel? No. If a guy (or guys) can't pull the trigger and make a clear Alpha move on a woman they really have proven they are disqualified.

      You must be sincere in the truth of power.

      There is no guilt in a fair game when you defeat an orbiter... even if they had orbited for years.

      Wow, that hit kinda hard. I'm fairly new to TRP (6 months) and am getting used to escalating fast and not being a beta/nice guy. Yesterday I grabbed a number from a girl who i had just met in my 6th period after 30ish minutes of Kino/Teasing and this guy that had been dropping tiny signals here and there and orbiting her (pretty hard too from what she told me, like going to her french class while she was in there to tell her jokes) looked like he had just been shot. Too him i must have looked like a total asshole. I couldn't help feeling a a little bit bad because i know exactly what that feels like. But I'm over it. If you want results, you have to act.

      [–]NeoreactionSafe 19 points20 points  (1 child)

      The coward dies a thousand deaths.

      The orbiter could pull the trigger at any time and make a move but he doesn't.

      A slave does not become free because someone frees him... he ultimately must free himself.

      The beta will experience pain and if this leads him to wisdom (Red Pill) then his life will be better.

      Don't let the childhood (beta) of another inhibit your adulthood. The beta orbiter might one day be Red Pill. Be glad that people grow up.

      .

      [–]rpscrote 1 point2 points  (0 children)

      there's a reason they call it game. You make moves, there is strategy, and you win some and you lose some. You dont feel bad when you beat someone in chess because they're bad at it. The problem is that the BP myth has caused men to not even realize they're playing chess.

      [–][deleted]  (4 children)

      [deleted]

        [–]ificandoityoucant 8 points9 points  (1 child)

        I watched a yt video a while ago where a guy was explaining how a guy was trying to take the girl he was working on. Don't remember the name but I'll describe it real quick. What he did was he started talking to the guy and pretended to be really interested in what he has to say, like they were talking about the guy's hobby and he was like "no fucking way that's fucking awesome", you know just sounding impressed and stuff. Then they ended up completely ignoring the girl and kept on talking.

        Then what happened is the chick saw that and was like "wow someone is flirting with me and he's ok with it?!". Then she was also getting ignored so she started getting desperate.

        What also happened is the other guy got side tracked and was losing terrain with the girl because he's busy having an interesting conversation with the author.

        At the end of the day, the author was deemed more valuable and took the girl home.

        The lesson here I think is to not act needy and just don't give a fuck. Instead of hating the guy trying to steal your girl, be friends with him. I've actually done a version of this subconsciously before when a friend was taking interest in my target, I didn't know about this technique back then but I think it's a good technique.

        [–]plsjustgo 0 points1 point  (0 children)

        lemme know if you find that video

        [–]NeoreactionSafe 2 points3 points  (0 children)

        You don't have to overtly take the women.

        She unconsciously is drawn to you so you aren't doing anything.

        You think:

        "The girl wants something and it's me... I'm her prize. Hmmmm... do I care?"

        An orbiter is a different type of human being. His world is really confused. Have some compassion for the guy. If the girl goes towards you make his exit as easy and comfortable as possible. Make him feel okay about you being her new boyfriend.

        He thinks:

        "Yeah I like the new boyfriend he's really cool. The last boyfriend she had was a real dick and that guy from two years ago was the worst. Of the five boyfriends she has had I like this guy the best."

        .

        [–][deleted]  (1 child)

        [deleted]

          [–]NeoreactionSafe 3 points4 points  (0 children)

          .

          And what to do, when I frequently just don't want to take real interest in other people?

          .

          It's like math... the answer is well defined.

          If you want to develop an extroverted capacity you have to "vert" your conscious energy in the "extro" direction.

          What is extroversion if not the knowing of people?

          Can you become extroverted to your postage stamp collection?

          No.

          Why?

          Because postage stamps aren't conscious beings.

          To be extroverted is to on some level accept that other humans exist.

          Many introverts on some deep level deny the existence of others.

          The extreme autistic denies interest in any world beyond himself so that he falls into pure self reflection.

          .

          The myth the introvert often tells himself is that he knows himself to be smarter than others. He tells himself this because he compares others actions to perfection.

          Things change dramatically when he actually has to "play the game" because when you are out extroverting and playing the game shit happens really fast. You don't get a "time out" to think how to react.

          So the introvert mocks others because he lacks experience.

          The true test is to get out there and join the chaos... your ability is determined by your quick wit and seduction style.

          The critic is always the lessor of the artist... be the artist... play the game.

          .

          [–]AllOrDeath 1 point2 points  (3 children)

          How are you defining the Blue Pill mythology?

          [–]NeoreactionSafe -1 points0 points  (2 children)

          Everything in the sidebar exposes the Blue Pill mythology.

          Example : Disney.

          .

          [–]AllOrDeath 0 points1 point  (1 child)

          I would like to read it in your words.

          [–]NeoreactionSafe 1 point2 points  (0 children)

          We are exposed to Blue Pill emotional indoctrination since birth.

          Some call it "brainwashing".

          It's like you are asking "what is the Blue Pill" and for most people who haven't woken up to the Red Pill I'd define it as:

          .

          "Beliefs held unconsciously that give a sense that everything is okay."

          .

          We might even say that what we want to believe to be "normal" is the Blue Pill myth.

          Red Pill is not comfort seeking because it's about facing reality.

          .

          Blue Pill is what the cows believe before they are slaughtered.

          .

          [–][deleted] 9 points10 points  (2 children)

          Another great technique can be found in the beginning of a book called Impro by Keith Johnstone. It is very similar to this but its less about meta-stating yourself and more about decoupling word from thing. (I highly recommend that book and I am convinced you would find value in it.)

          Basically you just go around pointing at things and shouting out the wrong names for them. You point at a desk and say "that's an apple," you point at a chair and say "that's a titty", etc. Pretty soon you stop READING the world and start ACTUALLY SEEING it, which also seems to be the goal of the excercise youre talking about.

          [–]joshsoowong 0 points1 point  (0 children)

          This seems like an awesome way to start a conversation out in public Ha!

          [–]TitusNoel[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

          I really like this. Thanks for sharing.

          [–]Endorsed Contributorbalalasaurus 34 points35 points  (12 children)

          What you're describing is mindfulness - something you should already be familiar with if you're meditating regularly. It is however, not a sufficient condition for extroversion.

          Rather than emphasize extroversion, the emphasis should be on general awareness. Not everyone can be an extrovert. But everyone can be more aware of the stimuli around them, be it verbal communication, body language perception or taking note of social cues.

          [–]USmellFunny 11 points12 points  (9 children)

          Not everyone can be an extrovert.

          I disagree. It's not like you're born either an introvert or an extrovert. For example, when I was in junior high, I was the most popular kid in class. Then followed my teenage years, where I shut myself in the house, started playing MMORPGs, wasted years in front of a computer screen. I became an introvert. I avoided talking to people, going outside, if I did have to talk to people I would be awkward, almost Aspergers-like. I repeat, coming from a "most popular kid" background. After I had enough of my miserable lifestyle I finally decided to make the effort to learn social skills. Improved my appearance, everything. I'm extroverted again.

          Introversion and extroversion are conditioned by your lifestyle, they aren't "programmed".

          [–]DoesNotMatterAnymore 3 points4 points  (0 children)

          I'm pretty sure you're using introversion / extroversion in the wrong context. I'm an introvert, social interactions drains me. Never in my life was able to party til the morning, 2am Max. Now it's midnight.

          [–]becredible 1 point2 points  (7 children)

          I disagree with you. You make introvert=Asbergers which is plain untrue. Yes, you can be born introverted but I don't think it means what you seem to think it means.

          Read "Quiet" by Susan Cain to get more perspective on this. An Alpha introvert can absolutely kill it in the field, especially since extroverts or people trying to be extroverts are a dime a dozen.

          [–]USmellFunny 2 points3 points  (6 children)

          You make introvert=Asbergers

          No I don't. Reread my post. I said that I became so socially-unskilled due to my isolation that I became "Aspergers-like". I'm well-aware that introversion and Aspergers are two completely unrelated things. But a very introverted person can have mannerisms and behaviours similar to those that have Aspergers.

          [–]becredible 2 points3 points  (5 children)

          Ah I see. I think introversion and extroversion aren't binary but are a spectrum, and we certainly have inclination to be at some point on the spectrum from birth. I also think you may have been more extroverted the whole time but you were held back by social anxiety. I know because I went through the same phase of MMOs, weed, and isolation. It was some of the darkest times of my life.

          However, though I am naturally more introverted than extroverted as I enjoy my own company and thoughts and recharge when alone, I yearned for human contact and relationships (by that I mean friendships too). Social anxiety limited me. I didn't become more introverted, I just became more socially anxious.

          The reason I make this distinction is because introversion in itself is not a bad thing as extroversion is not a bad thing. It does change game though.

          For example, opening sets at a packed bar may not be as comfortable for an introvert. Day game, opening in small private settings like lounges, bookstores, libraries, beer/wine tastings, art galleries, grocery stores, on hiking trails, etc may be easier for an introvert than an extrovert. More intimate settings are more comfortable.

          Also by making the distinction, it becomes clear that introversion cannot be used as an excuse to not engage the people around you. You stated that you didn't talk to people and then immediately stated that you became introverted in the next sentence. Introverts definitely talk to people and love to talk, just in smaller settings or to fewer people at a time. You didn't become more introverted, you became more socially anxious.

          [–]USmellFunny 1 point2 points  (4 children)

          A bit of an offtopic: I've been smoking weed for 9 years, took some time until I admitted to myself that it's really not harmless and that it wastes a lot of my time (I was self-medicating boredom with it instead of doing something constructive) and cash. I quit a couple of weeks ago as well.

          I'm curious, did you completely stop smoking it? Now, idk if I'm just trying to hamster here, but at a party or a NYE or shit like that I don't think that it would hurt to smoke. I don't feel the need to smoke in general. I just want to quit the problematic use of it (when alone or when bored) and I wonder if it's possible or if the only way is to stop smoking period.

          [–]becredible 2 points3 points  (2 children)

          For me it's really on topic because weed correlated to my social anxiety. Instead of confronting my issues, I would smoke. Once I realized it wasn't harmless, like you did, I stopped at once. I smoked all of the weed I had left and ditched all my paraphernalia. I realized that the way my life was going was shit, the pothead friends I had were shit, and I was becoming shit.

          Quitting was hard, and I still miss it sometimes. I used to make pot my identity and smoke daily, so quitting was definitely hard. To do it, I quit completely and also dissociated from all the pot smoking friends I had. This meant I had no friends. Life was not easy. I also got really into brewing tea. It was a hobby that replaced smoking for me and took my mind off of it. I also used the resource r-leaves for a while but it's been years since I've been there so I can't speak to the quality of the sub now.

          Once I got my shit together, which I couldn't have done with weed in my life, I got into graduate school and have been on a fast track to an awesome future. The red pill is the next big step in my life.

          If you need any help with quitting or want to talk about things, feel free to PM me. I'd be happy to help in any way I can because I know it can be more difficult to quit than people make it out to be.

          [–]USmellFunny 1 point2 points  (1 child)

          Thanks a lot for the helpful information. I can definitely draw a lot of parallels between your situation and mine. I have pretty much the same exact action plan, now that I freed a lot of time that I'd normally invest in smoking and playing League, I'm getting my driver's licence and going to some courses to try and land a better job. I'll PM if I feel like I'm losing my resolve, thanks again.

          [–]Endorsed Contributorbalalasaurus 1 point2 points  (0 children)

          Weed fucks with you plain and simple. There are people who are highly functional on it - but they are few and far in between the majority. I was a religious pot smoker for 6 years. Shortly after finding TRP I made the choice to quit for good. Couldn't have made a better decision for myself.

          [–]Dopebear 2 points3 points  (0 children)

          OP sounds like mindfulness 101 (meditation)

          As a practicer of Vipassana, it all sounded very theoretical to me. Taking the ego out of the equation and observing your surroundings objectively. Helps a lot, especially in situations than mere "game"

          Needless to say, I recommend all to try meditation. Try different methods out.

          [–]TitusNoel[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

          Rather than emphasize extroversion, the emphasis should be on general awareness.

          I also practice meditation and highly recommend it. That being said, I understand that it's been recommended to death and without it being focused on a particular subject (extroversion, cutting off thoughts, socializing) it loses its appeal for a lot of men.

          Not everyone can be an extrovert. But everyone can be more aware of the stimuli around them, be it verbal communication, body language perception or taking note of social cues.

          Yeah I mentioned that in the last part:

          This helps you extrovert. Notice I didn't say "become extroverted." That is a nominalization, making a process a stuck thing. Being extroverted is a process. By noticing things in your environment, and noticing that you are noticing these things, you shut down the bullshit in your head and further the process of extroversion.

          [–]philxd395 4 points5 points  (6 children)

          I always thought that extroversion was linked to Dopamine.

          Taking something like Sulbutiamine over a period of time increases D1 receptor density and reduces dopamine output, which makes you makes you SEEK out more novelty to feel good.

          This in turn lowers social inhibition and shyness.

          [–]magnue 6 points7 points  (0 children)

          This sounds like a terrible idea to me. In western society we're pretty much overwhelmed with dopamine (fast food/pornography/games etc). Excessive exposure to dopamine actually inhibits dopamine receptors, making the simpler things in life unrewarding.

          The counter to this is to actually stay away from life's pleasures - or at least limit them.

          I'd argue that serotonin is the connection chemical anyway.

          [–][deleted] 0 points1 point  (3 children)

          Have you tried this yourself?

          [–]philxd395 0 points1 point  (2 children)

          Yes, it works, there are studies for long term use as well. It works synergistically with phenibut as well.

          [–][deleted] 0 points1 point  (1 child)

          Phenibut is pretty dangerous though right?

          How long before the sibultiamine had an effect on your sociability? Can you elaborate on what the effects were for you?

          [–]philxd395 0 points1 point  (0 children)

          I cycle Phenibut no more than 2x a week. I will use it with sulbu if I'm going out, but I generally take it on off days. Both are really cheap, get the capsules for sulbu since it tastes like shit.

          The effects are subtle, but noticeable. However, you need put yourself in social situations. It basically eliminates all the self talk/doubt you may have before you want to say something, if that makes sense. It won't turn you into the most interesting person though.

          http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10858919

          [–]CallMyBS 2 points3 points  (2 children)

          Hey op, not disagreeing with anything you said, but could you expand a bit on some things?

          Being unable to communicate with physical objects, like a chair and a lamp, makes you unable to communicate with human beings in an extroverted fashion.

          I really did not understand where you were going with that. Could you maybe explain it?

          Also, I get that this drill is supposed to help one break down his mental barriers, but how am I supposed to apply in social situations? What are the logistics here? Do I just do this day to day and it'll help me, for lack of a better term, 'see more clearly'? Should I try and apply it directly on a social scenario also? And think like "I see those people. They look cool. I am going to talk to them". I already practice meditation every once in a while (I gotta get consistent), and it overlaps a lot with what you said.

          [–]TitusNoel[S] 2 points3 points  (1 child)

          I really did not understand where you were going with that. Could you maybe explain it?

          Basically, if you're not able to look at a chair and notice its qualities, and really notice that its a chair, not just glance over it, how can you do the same with other humans?

          This is essential because often we think we're fully aware of the person in front us, but our attention is elsewhere. Being able to put all the focus and awareness on the situation you're in allows you to be more adaptable and creative in that situation.

          but how am I supposed to apply in social situations?

          I don't necessarily practice this in social situations. I would just do it when I'm was alone until it became unconscious. You'll begin to extrovert more and more. Even now after practicing it for so long, so intensely, I can look up from my computer and take in so many objects, and notice their qualities. I was never able to do that before the drill.

          In social situations this allows me to pick up on everything that's going on, and not focus so intently on one person or my own thoughts. I can notice their clothes, accessories, the environment around me, all wonderful conversation topics.

          There's a bit more to being in touch with the external world. I'll create a post about it later.

          Hope that helped.

          [–]CallMyBS 0 points1 point  (0 children)

          Yeah, that made it more clear. I've done it several times this day, I'm not sure I 'get it', but I don't think that there is anything to 'get'. Anyway, I can already see how this could help. I remember a lot of details about a vase I saw at an ice-cream place.

          Thanks for the post, and for clarifying it for me op!

          [–]1Snivellious 3 points4 points  (0 children)

          This is superb advice. People are right when they say "this is mindfulness, not extroversion", but holding onto pure mindfulness in day-to-day life is quite difficult.

          The power of this tip is that it it's an easy-to-activate way to live in the moment. You don't need minutes and silence to clear your head, just a few seconds and something to look at. When you're thinking about sweet cars, or how nervous you are (and why you're nervous, and why you're thinking about why you're nervous, ad infinitum), you aren't engaging directly with the world. Your responses are slow, and you're more likely to miss moments for understanding and quick decisions. This is a great tool for reining in that distraction quickly.

          [–]reino341 2 points3 points  (1 child)

          I remember reading the same technique on RSDNation.

          http://www.rsdnation.com/node/300249

          [–]1InscrutablePUA 0 points1 point  (0 children)

          oh this is good stuff... i'm definitely gonna try it out. it is very similar to what OP is saying. it's especially good for doing a bit of daygame during the work day when you need to temporarily switch from 'work mode' to 'fun mode'

          [–]BaldyJoyful 2 points3 points  (0 children)

          This is an awesome way to describe it, thanks. after discovering TRP and changing my ways I was struggling to keep frame without over thinking and over analyzing everything (chatter). Like how you said to notice the lamp then notice that I notice the lamp that's exactly what I started to do. I thought of it like I was in a movie and was watching myself in 3rd person. Who wants to watch a movie where the protagonist just sits alone at the bar. You have to make the movie as intriguing as possible, and flowing down from that philosophy directly affects your social standing and frame.

          [–]4juice 1 point2 points  (1 child)

          notice that you are noticing it.

          I dont get this part. What do you mean, should i look at myself in the head from a third person view that i'm looking at the lamp post?

          [–]TitusNoel[S] 1 point2 points  (0 children)

          I look at the object and then put my focus on myself looking at the object. It's a bit meta, but that's the best way I can describe.

          "I am looking at a lamp." "I am noticing that I'm looking at a lamp"

          [–]potentialz 1 point2 points  (0 children)

          It's been a couple months since I've ingested the red pill and I've been avoiding this subreddit since I believe I internalized the core concepts and reading the same posts over and over was doing me no good.

          Coming back randomly and seeing this post makes me happy, knowing that there's useful knowledge still being posted on theredpill. As somewhat of an ambivert leaning towards introversion, this skill sounds easy to develop and very practical. Thanks.

          edit: I love how you mentioned how doctors view people as objects which is something I've never considered and it makes complete sense. Doctors cannot get emotionally attached to every patient or else it becomes emotionally taxing. As someone who dreams of becoming one in the future, I didn't realize red pill knowledge would apply to my dream occupation as well.

          [–][deleted]  (2 children)

          [removed]

          [–]TitusNoel[S] 1 point2 points  (1 child)

          Basically, if you're not able to look at a chair and notice its qualities, and really notice that its a chair, not just glance over it, how can you do the same with other humans?

          This is essential because often we think we're fully aware of the person in front us, but our attention is elsewhere. Being able to put all the focus and awareness on the situation you're in allows you to be more adaptable and creative in that situation.

          [–]a-memorable-fancy 1 point2 points  (0 children)

          Ive been telling myself lately that my grasp of the truth is getting stronger every day, but posts like this remind me I haven't even left the nest. Practical advice like this is always of great value to beginners like me.

          [–]therhymerr 1 point2 points  (0 children)

          Question. How do I look at something and simply not value it for its physical qualities. Like if I look at the chair I'm gonna say that looks comfortable and like a high quality chair or it looks like a shit chair. If I look at a girl I'll do the same but that chatter comes in to play for me shortly there after...

          [–]TheBloodIsRed 1 point2 points  (0 children)

          This idea is mentioned in The Charisma Myth (highly recommended that you read). The author talks about how when you feel nervous, angry, or impatient what helps is to stop and recognize that you are feeling these emotions, why you feel these emotions, and how your body is showing it.

          Examples:

          I'm about to approach this girl.

          "In my head": oh wow I'm getting pretty nervous. My heart is beating faster than usual. I think my breathing has changed too. I almost want to not talk to her anymore.

          An example the author uses...

          I am stuck in traffic and running late for a meeting

          " in my head": oh wow I my heart is racing faster. I am starting to get really impatient. I just yelled in the car even though they can't hear me. My face feels really warm.

          Just having this awareness really helps me keep a focused mind at least. Makes me appear more stoic and level-headed more often than I used to.

          [–]IveRedditAllNight 1 point2 points  (1 child)

          Actually seeing something instead of just resting your eyes on it.

          Believe it or not that just changed my life. Thank you

          [–]TitusNoel[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

          That's what its all about man :) That's why I post here. Thank you, believe it or not you just made my night.

          [–]J_AsapGem 1 point2 points  (0 children)

          This is so true we aren't as aware as we think we are, our minds wonder off so easily without us consciously knowing it

          [–]Endorsed ContributorLastRevision 1 point2 points  (0 children)

          When feeling social anxiety- I often have trouble maintaining eye contact when listening to someone explain something at great length at work and always feel a compulsion to do that half-second look-away- try focusing on the feeling in your feet. How they feel on the ground- how they feel in your shoes... This won't be so distracting that you won't pay attention to the speaker, but it will be distracting enough to turn off your the nervous part of your brain.

          [–]cool_story_bro_taken 0 points1 point  (0 children)

          Most extroverted people just say what is on their minds because this is how they think.

          I'm constantly analysing myself, what's wrong with me, etc. I don't want to say these things loud. This usually hits me when somebody asks me what is on my mind.

          [–]0_fox_are_given 0 points1 point  (0 children)

          Allthough your post is good.

          You mislabel what you are actually teaching...

          Being an "extrovert" involves having a number of different behaviours and habits. I understand what you mean when you say "be more extroverted" But for specificity's sake...

          What you really mean is become more present to the moment.

          Being present is a skill you can practice, that will help you in your social interactions because your mind is not floating off into thought.

          [–]rpscrote 0 points1 point  (0 children)

          One technique that really helps me with mindfulness I've picked up recently comes from a new venture I'm doing (writing fiction):

          When you are in a place, in your head try and describe/write the scene description. As you do this, try and get your descriptions to be more emotive and deep with the same amount of words, or if you have the time to sit and really go through it, more words.

          You would not realize how very much you can say about a 5x5 room until you try and describe the room precisely to someone else through words alone.

          [–]RedDeadlift 0 points1 point  (0 children)

          Great post. I am going to put this into practice right away.

          [–][deleted] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

          Gonna try this.

          I'm actually really obsessive and type A and when I finally get loose and go into party mode I'm probably the most hyped person I've ever seen, but I have to distract myself enough to let go.