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LTR50 Life Lessons From Marcus Aurelius,Emperor of Rome LTR (self.TheRedPill)

submitted by italianorgan

I don't know if this has been posted here before but here it is anyway for those who haven't seen it. I thought you guys would like this because you guys can actually get something out of this unlike some other subs

tell me what you guys think in the comments even if you only have the time to read a couple i understand.

really long read, if you cant read it right now, read it later.

1.

Concentrate every minute like a Roman – like a man – on doing what’s in front of you with precise and genuine seriousness, tenderly, willingly, with justice. And on freeing yourself from all other distractions. Yes, you can – if you do everything as if it were the last thing you were doing in your life, and stop being aimless, stop letting your emotions override what your mind tells you, stop being hypocritical, self-centered, irritable.

2.

How to act: Never under compulsion, out of selfishness, without forethought, with misgivings. Don’t gussy up your thoughts. No surplus words or unnecessary actions. Let the spirit in you represent a man, an adult, a citizen, a Roman, a ruler. Taking up his post like a soldier and patiently awaiting his recall from life. Needing no oath or witness. Cheerfulness. Without requiring other people’s help. Or serenity supplied by others. To stand up straight – not straightened.

3.

Your ability to control your thoughts – treat it with respect. It’s all that protects your mind from false perceptions – false to your nature, and that of all rational beings. It’s what makes thoughtfulness possible, and affection for other people, and submission to the divine.

4.

Forget everything else. Keep hold of this alone and remember it: Each one of us lives only now, this brief instant. The rest has been lived already, or is impossible to see. The span we live is small – small as the corner of the earth in which we live it. Small as even the greatest renown, passed from mouth to mouth by short-lived stick figures, ignorant alike of themselves and those long dead.

5.

Body. Soul. Mind. Sensations: the body. Desires: the soul. Reasoning: the mind. To experience sensations: even grazing beasts do that. To let your desires control you: even wild animals do that – and rutting humans, and tyrants. To make your mind your guide to what seems best: even people who deny the gods do that. Even people who betray their country. If all the rest is common coin, then what is unique to the good man? To welcome with affection what is sent by fate. Not to stain or disturb the spirit within him with a mess of false beliefs. Instead, to preserve it faithfully, by calmly obeying God – saying nothing untrue, doing nothing unjust. And if the others don’t acknowledge it – this life lived in simplicity, humility, cheerfulness – he doesn’t resent them for it, and isn’t deterred from following the road where it leads: to the end of life. An end to be approached in purity, in serenity, in acceptance, in peaceful unity with what must be.

6.

Our inward power, when it obeys nature, reacts to events by accommodating itself to what it faces – to what is possible. It needs no specific material. It pursues its own aims as circumstances allow; it turns obstacles into fuel. As a fire overwhelms what would have quenched a lamp. What’s thrown on top of the conflagration is absorbed, consumed by it – and makes it burn still higher.

7.

Does your reputation bother you? But look at how soon we’re all forgotten. The abyss of endless time that swallows it. The emptiness of all those applauding hands. The people who praise us – how capricious they are, how arbitrary. And the tiny region in which it all takes place. The whole earth a point in space – and most of it uninhabited. How many people there will be to admire you, and who they are. “The world is nothing but change, our life is only perception.”

8.

Choose not to be harmed – and you won’t feel harmed. Don’t feel harmed – and you haven’t been.

9.

That every event is the right one. Look closely and you’ll see. Not just the right one overall, but right. As if someone had weighed it out with scales. Keep looking closely like that, and embody it in your actions: goodness – what defines a good person. Keep to it in everything you do.

10.

Beautiful things of any kind are beautiful in themselves and sufficient to themselves. Praise is extraneous. The object of praise remains what it was – no better and no worse. This applies, I think, even to “beautiful” things in ordinary life – physical objects, artworks. Does anything genuinely beautiful need supplementing? No more than justice does – or truth, or kindness, or humility. Are any of those improved by being praised? Or damaged by contempt? Is an emerald suddenly flawed if no one admires it? Or gold, or ivory, or purple? Lyres? Knives? Flowers? Bushes?

11.

Love the discipline you know, and let it support you. Entrust everything willingly to the gods, and then make your way through life – no one’s master and no one’s slave.

12.

Nothing that goes on in anyone else’s mind can harm you. Nor can the shifts and changes in the world around you. – Then where is harm to be found? In your capacity to see it. Let the part of you that makes that judgment keep quiet even if the body it’s attached to is stabbed or burnt, or stinking with pus, or consumed by cancer.

13.

It’s unfortunate that this has happened. No. It’s fortunate that this has happened and I’ve remained unharmed by it – not shattered by the present or frightened of the future. It could have happened to anyone. But not everyone could have remained unharmed by it. Why treat the one as a misfortune rather than the other as fortunate?

14.

Take refuge in these two things: I. Nothing that can happen to me that isn’t natural. II. I can keep from doing anything that God and my own spirit don’t approve. No one can force me to.

15.

The things you think about determine the quality of your mind. Your soul takes on the color of your thoughts. Color it with a run of thoughts like these: I. Anywhere you can lead your life, you can lead a good one. II. Things gravitate toward what they were intended for. What things gravitate toward is their goal.

16.

Nothing happens to anyone that he can’t endure. The same things happen to other people, and they weather it unharmed – out of sheer obliviousness or because they want to display “character.” Is wisdom really so much weaker than ignorance and vanity?

17.

Things have no hold on the soul. They have no access to it, cannot move or direct it. It is moved and directed by itself alone. It takes the things before it and interprets them as it sees fit.

18.

Keep in mind how fast things pass by and are gone – those that are now, and those to come. Existence flows past us like a river: the “what” is in constant flux, the “why” has a thousand variations. Nothing is stable, not even what’s right here. The infinity of past and future gapes before us – a chasm whose depths we cannot see. So it would take an idiot to feel self-importance or distress. Or any indignation, either. As if things that irritate us lasted.

19.

The mind is the ruler of the soul. It should remain unstirred by agitations of the flesh – gentle and violent ones alike. Not mingling with them, but fencing itself off and keeping those feelings in their place. When they make their way into your thoughts, through the sympathetic link between the mind and body, don’t try to resist the temptation. The sensation is natural. But don’t let the mind start in with judgments calling it “good” or “bad.”

20.

When jarred, unavoidably, by circumstances, revert at once to yourself, and don’t lose the rhythm more than you can help. You’ll have a better grasp of the harmony if you keep on going back to it.

21.

Not to assume it’s impossible because you find it hard. But to recognize that if it’s humanly possible, you can do it too.

22.

I am composed of a body and a soul. Things that happen to the body are meaningless. It cannot be discriminate among them. Nothing has meaning to my mind except its own actions. Which are within its own control. And it’s only the immediate ones that matter. Its past and future actions are too meaningless.

23.

You take things you don’t control and define them as “good” or “bad.” And so of course when the “bad” things happen, or the “good” ones don’t, you blame the gods and feel hatred for the people responsible – or those you decide to make responsible.

24.

When you need encouragement, think of the qualities the people around you have: this one’s energy, that one’s modesty, another’s generosity, and so on. Nothing is as encouraging as when virtues are visibly embodied in the people around us, when we’re practically showered with them. It’s good to keep this in mind.

25.

I can control my thoughts as necessary; then how can I be troubled? What is outside my mind means nothing to it. Absorb that lesson and your feet stand firm.

26.

No matter what anyone says or does, my task is to be good. Like gold or emerald or purple repeating to itself, “No matter what anyone says or does, my task is to be emerald, my color undiminished.”

27.

The mind doesn’t get in its own way. It doesn’t frighten itself into desires. If other things can scare or hurt it, let them; it won’t go down that road on the basis of its own perceptions. Let the body avoid discomfort, and if it feels it, say so. But the soul is what feels fear and pain, and what conceives of them in the first place, and it suffers nothing. Because it will never conclude that it has. The mind itself has no needs, except for those it creates itself. It is undisturbed, except for its own disturbances. Knows no obstructions, except those from within.

28.

Frightened of change? But what can exist without it? What’s closer to nature’s heart? Can you take a hot bath and leave the firewood as it was? Eat food without transforming it? Can any vital process take place without something being changed? Can’t you see? It’s just the same with you – and just as vital to nature.

29.

To feel affection for people even when they make mistakes is uniquely human. You can do it, if you simply recognize: that they’re human too, that they act out of ignorance, against their will, and that you’ll both be dead before long. And, above all, that they haven’t really hurt you. They haven’t diminished your ability to choose.

30.

Look at the past – empire succeeding empire – and from that, extrapolate the future: the same thing. No escape from the rhythm or events. Which is why observing life for forty years is as good as a thousand. Would you really see anything new?

31.

Don’t pay attention to other people’s minds. Look straight ahead, where nature is leading you – nature in general, through the things that happen to you; and your own nature, through your own actions.

32.

Think of yourself as dead. You have lived your life. Now take what’s left and live it properly.

33.

Either pain affects the body (which is the body’s problem) or it affects the soul. But the soul can choose not to be affected, preserving its own serenity, its own tranquility. All our decisions, urges, desires, aversions lie within. No evil can touch them.

34.

Don’t try to picture everything bad that could possibly happen. Stick with the situation at hand and ask, “Why is this so unbearable? Why can’t I endure it?” You’ll be embarrassed to answer. Then remind yourself that past and future have no power over you. Only the present.

35.

Stop perceiving the pain you imagine and you’ll remain completely unaffected. External things are not the problem. It’s your assessment of them. Which you can erase right now. If the problem is something in your own character, who’s stopping you from setting your mind straight?

36.

Remember that when it withdraws into itself and finds contentment there, the mind is invulnerable. It does nothing against its will, even if its resistance is irrational. The mind without passions is a fortress. No place is more secure. Once we take refuge there we are safe forever. Not to see this is ignorance. To see it and not seek safety means misery.

37.

Other people’s wills are as independent of mine as their breath and bodies. We may exist for the sake of one another, but our will rules its own domain.

38.

To privilege pleasure over pain – life over death, fame over anonymity – is clearly blasphemous.

39.

To do harm is to do yourself harm. To do an injustice is to do yourself an injustice – it degrades you.

40.

Objective judgment, now, at this very moment. Unselfish action, now, at this very moment. Willing acceptance – now, at this very moment – of all external events. That’s all you need.

41.

Today I escaped from anxiety. Or no, I discarded it, because it was within me, in my own perceptions – not outside.

42.

Enter their minds, and you’ll find the judges you’re so afraid of – and how judiciously they judge themselves.

43.

Consider the lives led once by others, long ago, the lives to be led by others after you, the lives led even now, in foreign lands. How many people don’t even know your name. How many will soon have forgotten it. How many offer you praise now – and tomorrow, perhaps, contempt. That to be remembered is worthless. Like fame. Like everything.

44.

When you run up against someone else’s shamelessness, ask yourself this: Is a world without shamelessness possible? No. Then don’t ask the impossible. There have to be shameless people in the world. This is one of them. The same for someone vicious or untrustworthy, or with any other defect. Remembering that the whole world class has to exist will make you more tolerant of its members.

45.

Spiders are proud of catching flies, men of catching hares, fish in a net, boars, bears, etc. How they all change into one another – acquire the ability to see that. Apply it constantly; use it to train yourself. Nothing is as conducive to spiritual growth.

46.

To feel grief, anger or fear is to try to escape from something decreed by the ruler of all things, now or in the past or in the future. And that ruler is law, which governs what happens to each of us. To feel grief or anger is to become a fugitive – a fugitive from justice.

47.

Characteristics of the rational soul: Self perception, self-examination, and the power to make of itself whatever it wants. It reaps its own harvest, unlike plants, whose yield is gathered in by others. It reaches its intended goal, no matter where the limit of its life is set.

48.

If you don’t have a consistent goal in life, you can’t live it in a consistent way.

49.

Everything you’re trying to reach – by taking the low way round – you could have right now, this moment. If you’d only stop thwarting your own attempts. If you’d only let go of the past, entrust the future to Providence, and guide the present toward reverence and justice.

50.

It never ceases to amaze me: we all love ourselves more than other people, but care more about their opinion than our own.

Thanks for reading, sorry for long post but its worth it, tell me in the comments what you guys think.


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[–]RedPillWintergreen 87 points88 points  (10 children)

Lesson 51: Don't appoint your dipshit son to succeed you. It can precipitate the fall of an empire.

[–]Ramp_Up_Then_Dump 42 points43 points  (8 children)

Being good emperor

Being good philosopher

Being good father

Choose 2

[–]datmankaiser 22 points23 points  (5 children)

Your faults as a son is my failure as a father

[–]Ayubdj7 12 points13 points  (4 children)

No, not really. You can do your best as a father but somethings are out of your control.

[–]datmankaiser 9 points10 points  (1 child)

I agree. there are far too many influences on a person to reduce it down to the father's failings

[–]VolatileEnemy 2 points3 points  (0 children)

Bullshit, even terrible fathers have wonderful sons, but imagine if they had a good father. The father is absolutely responsible and there's way too many ways to fail as a father.

And hereditary or family-successions are the worst form of succession. Even companies have failed when the father gave their son the company. Some people are not meant to lead.

[–]autumn_lakers 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Doing your best doesn't mean your actions are without fault.

[–]TheGhandster 1 point2 points  (0 children)

It's a line from Gladiator...

[–]RedPillWintergreen 1 point2 points  (1 child)

Hah well there's a difference between being a neglectful father and raising a Caligula-type.

[–]Rick_OShay1 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Caligula-type.

The guy playing him in The Robe and it's sequel did an awesome job.

[–]1Imperator_Red 4 points5 points  (0 children)

This is really a misreading of history propagated by Edward Gibbon. He appointed his eldest son, as did virtually every other emperor who had one. Many emperors had no sons and usually adopted a male relative or had their chosen heirs marry into the family. If you disinherit your son and appoint some random, then the son will always be a threat to the regime for discontents to rally around. Not a realistic option. If you leave the throne to someone besides your son, literally the first thing the new emperor will do is kill him.

[–]TyroneTheDriver 45 points46 points  (0 children)

Commenting for later. I’ve read meditations and it’s fantastic.

[–]I_have_secrets 41 points42 points  (1 child)

How the fuck is this place quarantined?

[–]PhattyBacon 17 points18 points  (0 children)

Why would you want independent seekers of truth amassing "problematic" information and sifting thru it? Much easier to call them witches and burn them.

[–]bouldurer 24 points25 points  (1 child)

28 is the most important. Everything in life changes and nothing lasts forever. Be willing to change and mold yourself into a better man

[–]AnonymousADC 12 points13 points  (7 children)

Can you explain point 46 further? I can’t understand it

[–]TRP Vanguardnicethingyoucanthave 48 points49 points  (6 children)

Imagine that "ruler of all things" refers to god. Now think of something that would cause you anger or grief. Maybe you lost your job. Maybe a loved one died. Point 46 is saying, "that was god's will; he decreed it." If you're feeling anger or grief, then you're fighting god's will, or running away from it like a fugitive.

But "ruler of all things" doesn't have to mean god. He also says, "that ruler is law, which governs what happens to each of us." One of my favorite sayings that I learned from TRP is, "if you fight reality, then it works against you." The real world, the truths that we talk about here - the hard truths, the ugly truths of the red pill - those things are the law. They are laws of nature; truths of human sexuality. And if you feel anger or grief over the truth, then you're running from it like a fugitive, instead of accepting it.

The "anger phase" is a man trying to escape reality.

[–]Satou4 7 points8 points  (5 children)

I think this comment just shortened all of my future anger phases. The whole topic brings a lot of understanding. I will read Meditations myself and see if I can get any more out of it.

[–]TRP Vanguardnicethingyoucanthave 9 points10 points  (4 children)

Thanks man. It's easy to let something piss you off. I got AMOGed pretty hard about a week ago. Got mad about it, but the truth is, the gods of hypergamy decreed it. It's a feature, not a bug. Anger is a waste of my finite lifetime.

[–]AnonymousADC 1 point2 points  (0 children)

All you said its truth,ty bro!

[–]Shaney96 1 point2 points  (1 child)

Yeah, it's sometimes difficult to remind yourself of such truths when immersed in the ongoing situation. To accept the AMOGing as it's occurring and just smiling and realizing that this is part of nature, is something that is difficult but is a mindset I wish to cultivate.

Any suggestions/books (other than Meditations and the Enchiridion) you can recommend to catalyze getting through the anger phase?

[–]TRP Vanguardnicethingyoucanthave 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I can't think of any specific book recommendations beyond the standard stuff in the sidebar.

That question would make for a good askTRP thread though.

[–]bowhunter6 1 point2 points  (0 children)

I appreciate hearing this from someone such as yourself. Goes to show that none of us are perfect, and that we all have a ways to go on our journey. Like you said, not worth your time being angry about it, just dust yourself off and keep moving.

[–]NASCARnormie 13 points14 points  (0 children)

Speaking for all the spergles here i love lists as well

[–]MisterDeathclaw 5 points6 points  (0 children)

This...I fucking love this..." Never under compulsion, out of selfishness, without forethought, with misgivings. Don’t gussy up your thoughts. No surplus words or unnecessary actions. Let the spirit in you represent a man, an adult, a citizen, a Roman, a ruler. Taking up his post like a soldier and patiently awaiting his recall from life. Needing no oath or witness. Cheerfulness. Without requiring other people’s help. Or serenity supplied by others. To stand up straight – not straightened. "

[–]wMeteo 3 points4 points  (0 children)

Interesting that you posted this. Just finished Meditations. Will reread again.

[–]sogardnitsoc 2 points3 points  (1 child)

What means to live in accordance with nature?

[–]Imalostman_ 4 points5 points  (0 children)

To live in accordance with nature is to accept the things you cannot change (natural things). If you try to change them, you'll just waste your time. Nature or God will not be compelled.

Instead, use your time to better the things that are actually subject to your actions.

For example: don't worry too much about your height if you're not too tall. You can't change it. Meanwhile, you could instead go to the gym and improve in strength/health.

[–]ambiatica 2 points3 points  (2 children)

interesting, though did he wrote that? Got any source?

[–]italianorgan[S] 2 points3 points  (1 child)

Old website called Kratos guide, has a lot of good shit might post some more here soon but here the link of an archive of it https://web.archive.org/web/20160308185007/http://www.kratosguide.com/

[–]Einzakin 2 points3 points  (0 children)

That used to be my fav, upset he didn't keep it going. I tried to buy it many times.

[–]alpha_in_progress 4 points5 points  (7 children)

I don't usually comment here but if someone could respond that would be greatly appreciated. Stoicism is cool but I feel like it's become a bit of a meme. It's the go to answer for alot of stuff but I feel like it's not for everyone. One of my main gripes with it though, is that it makes me feel like I should be this paragon of virtue and justice which is cool, except for the fact that I think it clashes with what's preached here ( that not being flexible with your morals will put you at a disadvantage vs someone who is flexible with them, asshole game and Machiavellian tactics) it's hard to be cocky/funny without coming across as an asshole and assholes aren't exactly virtuous. I'm not trying to moralize I don't care what people do, just curious as to what people think. Blue pill conditioning has made it difficult for alot of men myself included to go out of our way to make women feel uncomfortable/ build up tension so they are attracted to you and I feel trying to incorporate that mindset while at the same time incorporating certain stoic principles are at odds. Does anyone feel the same way?

[–]1TheProphetPhysiquiel 16 points17 points  (0 children)

Stoicism isn't about action, it's about mental toughness. It would be foolish to never change your behavior when certain situations require it. Stoicism is about staying afloat when waves are rocking your ship; maybe you have to change course, maybe you have to abort your plan, but you know that you can persevere, and that these waves aren't going to beat you. You can compare stoicism to frame to get a grasp on the concept.

[–]Imalostman_ 2 points3 points  (4 children)

I have had thoughts similar to you. Then I imagined two personalities I could choose to have: one is in which I'm a cocky machiavellian bad boy who won't care too much about his actions' consequences on others, and one where I'm a strong, yet virtuous man and am gonna take care of a structure (religious, societal, national, whatever). I'd certainly choose the second and am trying to be that now.

Another way to look at this would be that weakness and bad stuff go hand in hand. A seemingly cocky 'chad' won't be as dependable or trustworthy, and might even backstab you because he is weak. He can't do better. But when you're dealing with a strong man, they're more likely to have your back if they're friends with you.

[–]Tripletag 1 point2 points  (3 children)

I see what you did. Imagine the two personalities and play out the scenario in your head where each one will lead. I understand your reasoning for choosing the virtuous archetype, but I would argue that the 'cocky machavellian' gets too much of a bad rap in the eyes of many, including the previous commenter. Being cocky and machavellian in nature (by which I assume you imply manipulative intent) does not mean, in my opinion, that the archetype in itself is malicious. Flexibility, guile and social savois-faire can equally be harnessed towards 'virtuous' activities as immovability, strength and loyalty to structure can be.

[–]Imalostman_ 2 points3 points  (2 children)

I agree. The virtuous archetype is not a perfectly moral man either though. He makes deals, and is super practical, which makes him machiavellian in a sense.

Maybe the difference could just be a few immovable principles like family and religion in the personality of the virtuous and strong man. Maybe those two are the only things that differentiate him from the playboy.

[–]Tripletag 2 points3 points  (1 child)

If you reduce it to two Jungian archetypes, the Trickster and the King, that is definitely the case. The Kings greatest strength but also his weakness is his immovable principles. They are necessary to provide the direction he sets his followers on, but become a burden once they cease to be useful.

The Trickster is essentially an archetype whose role is to upset the status quo in such a manner that an opportunity arises for change. In court symbolism, the King always had a Fool. The Fool was allowed next to the King as the only entity given some leniency in mocking the court and therefore also the King without being punished for dissidence. This is because the Fool stands outside of the status quo, therefore he can mock it and hold up a mirror to those inside and reveal the idiosyncracies that require tweaking for proper growth.

The dark side to this, as you rightly put, is a lack of stability. As fun as it can be to stick it to the rules, the Trickster or the Fool is generally not a well-liked figure. A figure like the modern-day playboy or eternal bachelor, to give an example closer to reality, will face scorn and judgment from many angles because he does not play by the rules. The irony is that the King, likewise, will face these same attitudes from his subjecs, albeit for the complete opposite reason: his adherence to the rules.

I guess the point is that whether you decide to uphold structure through principles like family and religion, or live your life mocking and critiquing such things, there is no route without adversity along the way.

[–]inittowinit777 1 point2 points  (0 children)

“The only way to avoid criticism is to say nothing, do nothing, and be nothing.”

  • Aristotle

[–]NeverNotDope 1 point2 points  (0 children)

At work and especially when I am out gaming i am always trying to implement and habituate as many comedic tactics as a can to get better at the art of humor as well as socializing. To get people to laugh, and laugh hard and often, you got to employ a variety of techniques, not just puns. Do do this you do risk offending and you have to a bit insensitive. Most people who go to the club are mature and can handle being used to make fun and will be a good sport. After all your boosting emotions. If you are not funny however i wouldn't try to be pursue the social strengths you already have. I am funny but not good at telling stories or even relating to most people. If you are the jester archetype, realize that the people who get offended are showing their weakness in character and not yours if you keep your smile. Even though i am a wit i still break some rules i probably shouldn't like one of the laws of power is don't say more than necessary (however i figure if you keep it strictly rhetorical you can be fine) I also am currently focusing on when to be stoic and be more calibrated on when i say a line or engage with the set. I tend to compete with the stoic types by being the opposite. Although its good to be both and know when to be which.

[–]CaptainBW 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Aurelius is good...Epictetus is better.

[–]iamdonkeybrained 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Great post, saved for later.

[–]satanicpriest13 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Solid post. Will go through it properly at leisure. Always love an insightful post about the imperator.

[–]RedGunnera 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Comment for later, I wonder how the translation is into English and if it’s pretty close to what Aurelius imagined

[–]banking_complaints 1 point2 points  (0 children)

One who is enchanted with the personality of a teacher may not become aware of the gaps in his theory, while those who are not enchanted will see only the gaps and not the fragments of truth. For his followers, Buddha is a buddha, an enlightened one – but for others he creates confusion because they see only the gaps. If you join all the gaps together it becomes destructive, but if you join all the fragments of truth together, it can become a foundation for your transformation.

[–]my_mix_still_sucks 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Kind of offtopic but I don't know where else to write about this for reason now after like 3 weeks I am finally able to view this sub on mobile again and I am really happy I missed posts like this one so much

[–]Zeparic 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Number 3 implies I am a separate thing from my thoughts. Whence does consciousness arise? From where there is no consciousness, from where there is no control. What use is it to tell someone to rid themselves of one delusion but supplant him with another.

[–]RoadkillPharaoh 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Good luck dude, I am also 19 and starting to learn about TRP. It's a tough journey, but I am sure it is well worth it.

[–]NeverNotDope 0 points1 point  (0 children)

These are awesome, feeling super motivated.

[–]LoveYourNeighbor3848 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I like the first 5.....saved

[–]jonpe87 0 points1 point  (0 children)

There is a lot of good advice here, but this one: "Choose not to be harmed – and you won’t feel harmed. Don’t feel harmed – and you haven’t been." Sounds not that good.